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Study in Australia

FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ Australia
  1. Do Australian institutions have a good reputation around the world?
  2. How do Australian institutions maintain quality?
  3. What accommodation is available to students?
  4. What is medical care like in Australia?
  5. Are Australians friendly to people from other cultures?
  6. How safe is Australia?
  7. Are there places of worship for my religion?
  8. Can I get the foods that I eat at home?
  9. How easy is it to find transport?
  10. What if I have personal problems or feel homesick?
  11. Can I get help setting up my finances?
  12. What will be the cost of my course?

1. Do Australian institutions have a good reputation around the world?

Australia is the third most popular study destination in the English-speaking world, with more than 174,000 international students choosing to study at Australian institutions in 2003.

Education is one of Australia’s major exports, and the Australian government invests billions of dollars each year in developing Australian education and university research. Since 1999, the government has run a "Knowledge and Innovation" program to ensure that research and training in Australia’s universities remain world class and are linked to innovation in industry. In 2003 the government invested more than $6.7 billion in higher education alone.

Australian institutions have an international focus in their courses and activities. They exchange staff with institutions overseas, participate in international forums, and have partnerships and joint projects with overseas institutions and international research centres.

Australia’s universities have made breakthroughs in modern technology and science, and Australian researchers have won six Nobel Prizes in areas of health, medicine, chemistry and physics.

Australia’s vocational training system, which is based on industry standards, is being used as a model for other Asia-Pacific countries.

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2. How do Australian institutions maintain quality?

The Australian Government ensures the quality of Australian institutions and courses in several ways.

  • Institutions must meet academic, financial, managerial and ethical standards to be accredited.
  • Courses offered to international students must be approved and listed on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS).
  • Qualifications offered to students must fit the Australian Qualifications Framework, which gives guidelines on the level of knowledge and skills a student must gain under each qualification. Guidelines are updated regularly to ensure qualifications are relevant to the national and international marketplace.
  • National agencies monitor teaching, learning, administration and research in institutions. Universities are audited every five years by the Australian University Quality Agency. Vocational education and training institutions are audited by the Australian National Training Authority.
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3. What accommodation is available to students?

Most international students in Australia live in rented accommodation. There is a range of options, both on campus and off campus to suit your needs.

Mentor Consultancy can help arrange your accommodation in Australia before you leave home.

Most Australian institutions have an Accommodation Officer or International Student Officer (or both) who can help you find a place to live. We can help you contact your institution directly.

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4. What is medical care like in Australia?

Australia has a high standard of medical care, with a government system that offers medical services to all people. Your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) will help pay for your medical care, ensuring you have access to services when you need it. OSHC is compulsory for all international students coming to Australia.

Most of the larger universities provide medical facilities on campus; some even have specialist doctors. Smaller institutions and schools have trained first-aid staff.

There are medical centres and hospitals throughout all cities and towns. You can request to see a male or female doctor at any medical centre. For a higher fee you can also request a specific doctor of your choice, which can be useful if you will need to see a doctor frequently during your time in Australia.

There are many bilingual doctors throughout Australia. You can find them through the local telephone directory or local language newspaper.

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5. Are Australians friendly to people from other cultures?

Many students have been surprised by the friendliness of Australians, often telling stories of strangers helping them on the street.

To Australians, cultural diversity is part of their national identity. The country thrives on the contributions different cultures have made to society, commerce, sport, arts and education.

The people of modern Australia come from more than 140 different countries. Around 23 per cent of Australians were born in another country; 25 per cent have at least one parent who was born in another country; and 15 per cent speak a language other than English at home.

Equal opportunity laws protect people from unfair treatment based on their culture, gender, religion or sexuality. Women are equal to men by law.

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6. How safe is Australia?

Australia is very safe, with a low crime rate, political stability and a peaceful society. In most places, streets are clean, open and well-lit at night. The incidence of robbery and assault is relatively low and Australia has strict anti-gun and drug laws.

A peaceful country, Australia has never had a civil war, had to fight for territory or had a political coup. The government is democratically elected, and is not ruled by the military nor based on religion. Australia is part of the British Commonwealth – the Queen of England is also the Queen of Australia. She is represented in Australia by the Governor-General.

Australia is free of many diseases encountered by travelers in other countries. Even in Australia’s tropical areas there is no risk of common tropical diseases such as malaria and yellow fever. Because of its cleanliness and sanitation, Australia is also free of diseases such as cholera and typhoid.

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7. Are there places of worship for my religion?

Many institutions have prayer rooms where students can worship their own religions, as well as a chaplain to provide spiritual support. Some universities have special facilities for Muslim students.

In Australian cities and towns you will find places of worship for many religions including Islam, Buddhism, Judaism, Sikhism, Catholicism, the various Protestant churches, Assembly of God, Seventh Day Adventism, Jehovah’s Witness and Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

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8. Can I get the foods that I eat at home?

Because Australia is multicultural, it is easy to find foods from a range of cultures. There are Asian grocery stores and European delicatessens in most cities and towns, as well as shops for vegetarian, vegan or kosher food, and butchers who prepare halal meat.

There is also a range of international restaurants in all cities and towns, such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Indian, Malaysian, Turkish, Italian, Japanese and Mexican. Institution residences, boarding houses and cafeterias usually serve some vegetarian dishes and dishes from a variety of cultures. You can make special requests if required.

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9. How easy is it to find transport?

You can arrange for a staff member from your institution to meet you at the airport when you first arrive in Australia and take you to your accommodation. Students going to homestay accommodation are usually met at the airport by their host family. Many institutions offer an orientation service, taking you through the city or town and around campus to help you become familiar with your new surroundings.

Most students rely on public transport or bicycles to get around. Some students buy a car, but this can be expensive.

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10. What if I have personal problems or feel homesick?

Institutions have counsellors who are trained to help students with personal problems, particularly problems associated with being an international student, such as homesickness, culture shock and stress. Counsellors can give you free, confidential advice and introduce you to support groups that can help you in the longer term.

Many institutions have international student associations and clubs for people from particular cultures or religions where you can talk with peers who have experienced similar challenges of staying in a foreign country. You may also find support groups for students in the same course as you, at the same level of study as you, or who are just experiencing similar problems.

Australian institutions recognise the importance of keeping in touch with your family and friends at home, and many institutions offer free or subsidised email accounts so you can contact home whenever you need to.

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11. Can I get help setting up my finances?

The international student office or student services unit at your institution can advise you on banking and finances in Australia and how to budget your money to avoid financial troubles. They can also help you find part-time work so you have a small income to supplement your savings.

Many universities and large institutions have a bank branch on campus. The tellers in these branches are accustomed to dealing with student finances and can give you advice.

Your family can deposit money directly into your Australian account from home, which allows you to access the money quicker than a cheque or bank draft sent in the mail. These transfers usually take around three days to clear. Most banks enable phone banking and internet banking.

Some larger institutions offer emergency finance loans, but funds are strictly limited and you must repay all the money plus interest.

To be granted a student visa into Australia, you must have the finances you need to cover all tuition fees and living costs for the length of your stay. You should therefore not have major financial problems during your studies.

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12. What will be the cost of my course?

Undergraduate degrees are generally three years in Australia.

There are many one-year Masters degrees including MBA. Thus you can save on living costs and tuition fees.

Undergraduate Studies (fees for complete course)
Courses Tuition Fees Living Costs Average Total Costs
*All costs are in US Dollars
Science $27,054 $31,574 $58,628
Business $19,325 $31,574 $50,899
Others $19,325 $31,574 $50,899
Master's Degrees (annual costs)
Courses Tuition Fees Living Costs Average Total Costs
Science $14,000 to $16,000 $8,000 to $12,000 $22,000 to $28,000
Business $16,000 to $18,000 $8,000 to $12,000 $24,000 to $30,000
Others $8,000 $8,000 to $12,000 $16,000 to $20,000
*All costs are in US Dollars

You can use our live currency converter to check today's exchange rates.

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